Can We Reduce Salinity Effects by the Application of Humic Acid on Native Turfgrasses in order to Attain Sustainable Landscape?

Document Type: Original Article

Authors

1 PhD. Student of Ornamental Plant, Department of Horticultural Science and Landscape, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran

2 Professor, Department of Horticultural Science and Landscape, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran

3 Faculty of Agriculture, Tabriz University, Tabriz, Iran.

4 Msc. of Horticultural Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Tabriz University, Tabriz, Iran

Abstract

Soil salinity is one of the most important problems in dry and semi-dry climate areas of the world. So, we investigated the effects of humic acid on visual quality and quantity parameters of native turfgrasses in compared to commercial one under salinity stress to explore can we reduce salinity effects by humic acid or not? So, an experiment was arranged in factorial experiment based on randomized complete design with three replications. The first factor was three grasses consist of two native accessions of Lolium perenne ҅Chadeganʼ and ҅Yarandʼ and its commercial variety, the second factor was four concentrations of humic acid (HA) (0, 5, 10, 15 g kg-1) and the third factor consisted of three levels of salinity (0, 150, 300 mM). Results of analysis of variance indicated that the interaction effects of cultivar × HA was significant in all traits (P<0.01) except uniformity and height. The treatment of cultivar × salinity significantly affected color, texture, smoothness, uniformity and RWC (P<0.01) and total quality (P<0.05). Treatment of HA × salinity had not significant influence on smoothness and uniformity but other traits were significantly influenced at 5% probability level and RWC at 1% level. Triple interaction effect was significant on texture, quality after clipping, uniformity and RWC (P<0.01) and height (P<0.05). Application of HA could decreased salinity effect on darkness, texture and increased quality after clipping and relative water content of leaves under salinity stress.  Also, increasing of severity of salinity had reduction effect on plant height and total quality even with HA application. In conclusion, plants grow on soils which contain adequate humic acids (HA) are less subject to stress condition, are healthier because of having higher relative water content in contrast salinity condition.

Highlights

  • One of the important effect of HA application was preserve relative water content of leaves in severe salinity stress condition.
  • In this experiment humic acid improved color, texture, quality after clipping and RWC in all studied turfgrasses.
  • humic acid had not similar effect on total quality of studied grasses.
  • Lolium perenne "Chadegan" had the highest growth at all of salinity levels than other grasses.
  • Plants grow on soils which contain adequate humic acids (HA) are less subject to stress condition.

Keywords


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